Overlook Neighborhood Update (March 5)

1) OKNA Board meeting (March 7)
2) Legal clinic on city’s new tenant relocation assistance ordinance (March 15)
3) Coffee with Rep. Tawna Sanchez (March 18)
4) Sunday Parkways returns to North Portland in June


1) OKNA Board meeting (March 7)

The Overlook Neighborhood Association Board will meet on Tuesday to discuss a variety of topics. The agenda includes Patton Park, homeless camps, neighborhood cleanups and more. Board meetings are open to the public.

OKNA Board meeting (agenda)
Tuesday, March 7, 6:30-8 p.m.
Historic Overlook House (3839 N Melrose Dr.)

2) Legal clinic on city’s new tenant relocation assistance ordinance (March 15)

The Portland City Council recently approved an ordinance that requires landlords to pay tenants relocation assistance in the case of a no-cause eviction, rent increase greater than 10 percent or failure to renew or replace an expiring lease with substantially the same terms.

That ordinance is being challenged in court. Tenants who might take advantage of it if it survives that legal challenge can learn how at an upcoming city-sponsored clinic. The city has partnered with Oregon Law Center and Legal Aid Services of Oregon to host a free legal clinic.

Free legal clinic on relocation assistance
Wednesday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.
David Douglas High School (1001 SE 135th Ave.)

3) Coffee with Rep. Tawna Sanchez (March 18)

State Rep. Tawna Sanchez will hold a constituent coffee hour on March 18 to discuss what she’s been up to in Salem during the legislative session.

Q&A with Rep. Tawna Sanchez
Saturday, March 18, 9-10 a.m.
PCC Cascade, Student Union Room 203/204 (705 N Killingsworth St.)

4) Sunday Parkways returns to North Portland in June

Believe it or not, summer is right around the corner, and The Portland Bureau of Transportation has announced its schedule for the Sunday Parkways season. This nationally and internationally acclaimed series of Open Street events is celebrating its 10th year in motion. The streets will close to traffic so that bikers and walkers can enjoy safe tours of the city’s neighborhoods.

The North Portland Parkways will be on June 25. The route this year touches a corner of Overlook. Learn more about the event and routes in other neighborhoods on the official website.

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Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 24)

1) Get your preparedness on! (Feb. 25)
2) Tell Portland which potholes to patch


1) Get your preparedness on! (Feb. 25)

Join your Overlook neighbors and new friends from other neighborhoods on Saturday at Putting Preparedness Into Action, a free half-day (9:45 to 2) preparedness event at Beach Elementary School. The event is organized by Sustainable Overlook and Overlook’s Neighborhood Emergency Team (NET). Steve Eberlein from the American Red Cross will give a presentation in the morning.

After lunch (bring your own if you didn’t register and reserve a lunch in advance), there will be info and activities to put you in the ‘prep’ frame of mind. Bring your ‘go bag’ if you want to show it off.

Overlook Sustainability Summit: Putting Preparedness Into Action
Saturday, Feb. 25, 9:45 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Beach Elementary School (1710 N Humboldt St.)

2) Tell Portland which potholes to patch

The Portland Bureau of Transportation has launched Patch-a-thon, a new initiative to fill the numerous potholes caused by this season’s many winter storms.

There is currently a backlog of more than 1,000 potholes that have been identified by residents and city crews. During Patch-a-thon, PBOT will dedicate extra crews and resources to address the current backlog. During normal operations, PBOT has two to three crews repairing potholes. During Patch-a-thon, this number will rise to 12 to 15 crews.

In the coming weeks, PBOT will hold a Patch-a-thon on those days when the weather permits effective and safe pothole repair. PBOT will continue Patch-a-thon until the winter pothole backlog has been cleared.

PBOT crews fill more than 8,000 potholes a year, working year round. The work is weather dependent and crews are sometimes diverted to emergencies such as landslides.

Portlanders are encouraged to report potholes by sending a detailed description and photos to PBOT dispatchers by email pdxroads@portlandoregon.gov or by using the PDX Reporter App. They can also call 503-823-1700, PBOT’s 24 hour maintenance line.

View the interactive pothole map, so you can track Patch-a-thon’s progress.

Posted in Sustainable Overlook, Transportation | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 24)

Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 19)

1) OKNA general meeting (Feb. 21)
2) Protected bike lane proposed for N Greeley Avenue
3) Third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit (Feb. 25)


1) OKNA general meeting (Feb. 21)

You don’t want to miss the upcoming Overlook Neighborhood Association general meeting. The agenda is packed with important updates that will affect everyone in the neighborhood. We’ll hear from a representative of the Hazelnut Grove homeless camp about what’s been going on there, and from a representative of Portland Public Schools about the upcoming construction bond. Developers of two multi-family residential projects along the Interstate Corridor also will present and answer questions. One will be on the current site of the Overlook Restaurant, and the other is on N Montana Avenue between N Prescott and N Going streets.

OKNA general meeting (agenda)
Tuesday, Feb. 21, 6:30-8 p.m.
Kaiser Town Hall Building (3704 N Interstate Ave.)

2) Protected bike lane proposed for N Greeley Avenue

BikePortland reports that the Portland Bureau of Transportation has plans to install a two-way protected bike lane on N Greeley Avenue between Going and Interstate. Riders and motorists alike would benefit from this change. Greeley carries a high volume of traffic, especially truck traffic to and from Swan Island, that passes perilously close to bike riders. The highway interchange in particular, where the southbound bike lane crosses the traffic lanes, is particularly dangerous.

As part of a repaving project, a multi-use path with room for bikers and pedestrians could be installed along the east (bluff) side of the road with concrete barriers providing separation from traffic. Riders would benefit from improved safety, and drivers would no longer have to worry about bikers swerving into traffic lanes unexpectedly to avoid debris in the bike lane.

Learn more about the proposal at BikePortland’s website.

3) Third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit (Feb. 25)

Someday a catastrophic earthquake will strike Portland. Join your neighbors on Saturday to learn more about how to prepare for disaster. The third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit at Beach School will feature a presentation from the American Red Cross and information from a variety experts on the topics of disaster resilience and emergency preparation.

The Overlook NET (Neighborhood Emergency Team) will run a practice staging event so you can practice with radios, triage and shelter development. Lunch available from Atomic Pizza by reservation ($7 per person).

Learn more and RSVP online.

Overlook Sustainability Summit: Putting Preparedness Into Action
Saturday, Feb. 25, 9:45 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Beach Elementary School (1710 N Humboldt St.)

 

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Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 11)

1) Overlook is a welcoming neighborhood
2) Overlook Neighborhood Emergency Team bimonthly meeting (Monday, Feb. 13)
3) Third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit (Feb. 25)
4) Neighborhood streets community survey
5) Street work around Mocks Crest this summer


1) Overlook is a welcoming neighborhood

At its Feb. 7 meeting, the Overlook Neighborhood Association Board adopted the following resolution of inclusion and support for all Overlook neighbors:

The Overlook Neighborhood Association welcomes refugees, immigrants, people of any color or ethnicity, people of any religious belief, and people of any sexual orientation or gender identity. In short, we are a welcoming place for all. We will not tolerate hateful rhetoric that scapegoats these communities or that threatens our neighbors. We will not remain idle when any member of our community is targeted by bigotry. We are stronger together as a neighborhood and city.

2) Overlook Neighborhood Emergency Team bimonthly meeting (Monday, Feb. 13)

Join the Overlook Neighborhood Emergency Team (NET) for its bimonthly meeting (even numbered months) at Lucky Lab Tap Room on Monday, 6:30-8 p.m. The meeting will focus primarily on the upcoming Sustainability Summit on Feb. 25. Additional items to be covered include a follow-up on the January mid-ice storm visit to the fire station, look ahead to the Overlook Park walkaround in March and a full call-up for Overlook NET in July.

Advance check-in by radio (channel 5) starts at 6 p.m.

Overlook NET bimonthly meeting
Monday, Feb. 13, 6:30-8 p.m.
Lucky Lab Tap Room (1700 N Killingsworth St.)

3) Third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit (Feb. 25)

Is your household ready for a natural disaster? Take heart, preparation is a spectrum, and the third annual Overlook Sustainability Summit – Putting Preparedness into Action is coming on Feb. 25 to help you get ready or more ready.

The American Red Cross’ Steve Eberlein will speak about best practices learned after the Indonesian earthquake/tsunami event and introduce us to Prepare Out Loud, a Red Cross initiative.

The Summit won’t be all talk; it’ll be all action. Mingle with neighbors and experts, and get hands-on demonstrations and discussions about go bags, pet preparedness and sanitation. Bring your go bag for an evaluation, and get ideas for improvement.

The Overlook NET (Neighborhood Emergency Team) will run a practice staging event so you can practice with radios, triage and shelter development. Lunch available from Atomic Pizza by reservation ($7 per person).

Find all of the schedule details and RSVP at sustainableoverlook.org /summit-2017.

Overlook Sustainability Summit: Putting Preparedness Into Action
Saturday, Feb. 25, 9:45 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Beach Elementary School (1710 N Humboldt St.)

4) Neighborhood streets community survey

The condition of streets and sidewalks in front of homes and throughout Portland’s neighborhoods affects how people get around. The Portland Bureau of Transportation wants to hear about how you use residential side streets, problems you experience as you try to get around Overlook, and your input about your expectations for residential street improvements in the Portland.

  • Take the survey to tell PBOT how the Neighborhood Streets Program can best serve you. The survey will take only a few minutes to complete and is available in English, Español, Việt Ngữ, 中文, and Русский.

PBOT has begun the planning process to develop policies and funding options for improving residential side streets. Your input on this survey will help them understand where to focus efforts and what to prioritize in the new program.

The goals for the Neighborhood Streets Program are to develop:

  • A sustainable funding strategy to fix unimproved streets
  • A process to prioritize residential street projects
  • A process to determine what street standards to apply for each project
  • An inclusive, effective, and equitable public engagement process that is built upon community values and priorities

If you have questions or require additional information on the program or survey, please contact Anne Hill at anne.hill@portlandoregon.gov.

5) Street work around Mocks Crest this summer

Sunset viewers at Mocks Crest will have to maneuver around some roadwork this spring. Environmental Services, the city’s sewer and stormwater utility, is extending the public sewer system to properties where service is only available through a neighboring property. Under N Skidmore Terrace, this project will install 540 feet of main line sewer pipe, three new manholes, and branch connections to ten properties allowing them to make direct connections the public sewer. This project will help protect public health, water quality, and the environment.

Construction will begin in February and is expected to be completed in June. The first activities will include survey, and moving equipment and materials into the area. Learn more about the project here.

 

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Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 4)

1) Support Overlook businesses that have been broken into
2) How’s your apartment’s bicycle parking?
3) Get help paying your water bill
4) OKNA Board meeting (Feb. 7)


1) Support Overlook businesses that have been broken into

Ne’er-do-wells attempted to break into two Overlook neighborhood businesses on N Killingsworth Street. Both The Naked Sheep Knit Shop and NoPo Paws suffered some expensive damage, including broken glass, and theft in one case. If you’re a crafter or knitter or have a pet at home, consider stopping by their shops and showing some Overlook support.

2) How’s your apartment’s bicycle parking?

Do you live in an apartment? The Portland Bureau of Transportation wants to know how good your bicycle parking options are.

Portland has set a goal of having 25 percent of trips in the city be by bike. Working toward that goal, PBOT is currently in the middle of reviewing and updating the Bicycle Parking code requirements to ensure the provision of adequate, comfortable, accessible and secure bicycle parking for new buildings and major redevelopment throughout Portland. The current text of the Bicycle Parking section of City Code (Chapter 33.266 Parking and Loading) was largely written and adopted in 1996 [there was a significant update in 2004 for short-term bicycle parking, and in 2010 to update the amount of required long-term bicycle parking spaces for multi-family dwellings].

PBOT has convened a Stakeholder Advisory Committee to help guide the process and address key issues around short and long-term bicycle parking in new buildings. While the committee is grappling with a number of key issues, one of the current focus areas is on apartment/ multi-family dwelling bicycle parking, and specifically how and where to provide long-term, secure bicycle parking for residents.

In order to help the committee make sound recommendations, it is gathering information from apartment residents.

Please weigh in on the bicycle parking and rack usability of your apartment by taking PBOT’s survey.

3) Get help paying your water bill

Customers who need help paying their utility bill, or are looking for ways to reduce their bill, are invited to take advantage of the Water Bureau’s variety of financial assistance programs. These programs come in the form of payment arrangements, bill discounts for sewer and water charges, crisis vouchers, fixture repair services, Utility Safety Net program and more.

To learn more about the financial assistance and reduction programs available to you and how you might qualify visit the Financial Assistance page or contact Customer Service at 503-823-7770 or PWBCustomerService@portlandoregon.gov.

4) OKNA Board meeting (Feb. 7)

The Overlook Neighborhood Association Board will meet on Tuesday, Feb. 7 to discuss goings on in the neighborhood and to look over the upcoming Overlook Views newsletter. Board meetings are open to the public.

OKNA Board meeting (agenda)
Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6:30-8 p.m.
Historic Overlook House (3839 N Melrose Dr.)

Posted in Business, OKNA, Transportation | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Feb. 4)

Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 29)

Plant workshops at Trillium Charter School

With the days growing longer and the snow, we hope, behind us, it’s time to think about garden projects for the spring and summer. Three upcoming workshops at Trillium Charter School (5420 N Interstate in Overlook) are a great way to get started.

Naturescaping basics
Presented by East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District
Saturday, Feb. 4, 9 a.m – 1 p.m.

Naturescaping is the practice of designing (or redesigning) your landscape so that it reduces water use and decreases stormwater runoff while saving you time, money and energy. This introductory workshop introduces the core concepts of naturescaping, and also explores:

  • pollution prevention through the reduction/elimination of chemical use
  • how native plants naturally resist pests & tolerate drought conditions while attracting native birds, butterflies and other beneficial pollinators to your garden
  • basic site planning principals, and many other great natural gardening & design tips

Learn more and register online.

Seed to supper
Presented by Oregon Food Bank
Mondays at 5:30 p.m. starting Feb. 6

Seed to Supper is a free 6-week beginning gardening course that gives adult gardeners the tools they need to successfully grow a portion of their own food on a limited budget. Participants will be given a free gardening book, seeds, plant starts, trowels, a certificate of completion and more.

Register online.

Urban weeds
Presented by East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District
Thursday, March 2, 6:30-9 p.m.

Weeds – we all have them. Come learn how to identify the most common garden and landscape weeds along with some of the other more notorious plant invaders of the region. We will walk you through how these aggressive plants take over in your yard and provide some simple yet effective tips that will help you get the upper hand without turning to synthetic herbicides.

Register online.

Posted in Sustainable Overlook | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 29)

Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 22)

1) Town hall meeting with local legislators (Jan. 28)
2) Green Sky Collective
3) Cloudy water


1) Town hall meeting with local legislators (Jan. 28)

Three state legislators representing parts of Overlook will hold a town hall meeting next month. Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, newly elected Rep. Tawna Sanchez and Sen. Lew Frederick invite the constituents to attend the session previewing the 2017 legislative session. Residents will have an opportunity to ask questions and share their priorities.

Legislative town hall
Saturday, Jan. 28, 10-11:30 a.m.
PCC Cascades Campus, Moriarty Auditorium (NE corner of N Albina and N Killingsworth)

2) Green Sky Collective

Neighborhood marijuana dispensary Green Sky Collective on N Interstate Ave. has submitted its city-required Marijuana Control Plan. The plan spells out how a retailer plans to mitigate livability concerns such as noise, parking and garbage.

The dispensary values its relationship with its neighbors and continuously strive[s] to reduce any negative impacts to neighborhood livability by putting policies and procedures in place to mitigate negative impacts. These include, but are not necessarily limited to:

1) Not playing store music above reasonable levels

2) Discouraging customers from gathering or loitering on dispensary grounds for any extended period of time (monitored via external cameras), and discouraging customers from playing loud music from their cars while waiting for a friend to complete their purchase inside

3) Having a private, off-street, well-lit main parking lot for customers

4) Having refuse and recycling containers maintained and regularly emptied (and never containing any marijuana product)

5) Performing exterior property walk-throughs throughout the day to check for unwanted guests or litter

6) Discouraging customers in the parking lot from playing loud music in their cars while on site.

Read Green Sky’s full plan.

3) Cloudy water

Throughout the year, the Portland Water Bureau’s Water Line receives calls from customers who say their tap water appears milky white or cloudy.

In the majority of cases the cloudy water is caused by harmless air bubbles, but sometimes it can indicate a water heater issue.  Fortunately, determining the cause is as simple as filling up a clear glass with water and setting it on the counter.

  • If the water clears from the bottom of the glass to the top, the water has air bubbles. This reaction sometimes occurs when cold water from underground mains enters warmer pipes inside your home. Since cold water holds more dissolved air than warm water, as water warms air may be released as tiny bubbles when a tap is turned on. The water is safe to drink, the discoloring is just the result of a harmless reaction.
  • If the water in the glass clears from the top-down, and white or grey particles settle to the bottom, this may indicate a water heater issue. To determine the type of issue, remove some of the particles from the water and add them to a small amount of vinegar. If the particles dissolve, this indicates mineral content and your hot water heater may require maintenance. If the particles don’t dissolve, it is likely the water heater dip tube is breaking down and repair is needed.

To learn about water quality at home, visit the Water Bureau’s Drinking Water Quality webpage or contact the Water Quality Line at 503-823-7525 or WBWaterLine@portlandoregon.gov (8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday).

Posted in Business, Portland - City, Safety | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 22)

Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 15)

1) Prepare for potential flooding
2) Overlook Neighborhood General Meeting (Tuesday, Jan. 17)
3) Report downed trees on public lands
4) Patton Square Park Survey
5) Skip the Emergency Room if you can


1) Prepare for potential flooding

An atmospheric river system arriving in the middle of next week threatens heavy rainfall that, coupled with melting snow, could cause flooding. If you can, please clear storm drains near your home. Drains blocked by debris or ice can cause urban pooling in neighborhoods. That standing water is dangerous to vehicle and pedestrian traffic. If it is particularly high, it can flood into residential properties.

Learn more about clearing city storm drains by clicking here.

2) Overlook Neighborhood General Meeting (Tuesday, Jan. 17)

Join your Overlook neighbors at our upcoming general meeting to find out what’s going on around the neighborhood. Topics on the agenda for discussion include Patton Square Park, presentations about development projects along Interstate Avenue and a presentation about the upcoming Portland Public School construction bond measure.

OKNA General Meeting (agenda)
Tuesday, Jan. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Kaiser Town Hall Building (3704 N Interstate Ave.)

3) Report downed trees on public lands

If you find a newly downed tree or large limbs on public land, please report it to Portland Parks and Recreation Urban Forestry crews at 503-823-TREE (8733). The crews are working hard to clear trees and large limbs from Portland’s streets. On the first day of the storm, crews worked on trees which blocked TriMet tracks in four locations, allowing trains to continue vital service.

As of mid-day Friday, there were more than 200 calls made to 823-TREE. All emergencies will be addressed in time, but work is expected to take weeks. Crews are working on the areas of biggest impacts first, mitigating any safety issues before clearing debris.

For more information on PP&R Urban Forestry, including permits, contact information, and resources, please visit their website.

4) Patton Square Park Survey

Friends of Patton Square Park thank the neighbors who have completed the survey about Patton Square Park and the playground enhancement project.  If you haven’t yet completed the survey, time remains to share your input. All users of the park – with and without children – are encouraged to participate to that we can develop a plan that will serve everyone.

Take the survey online by clicking here.

5) Skip the Emergency Room if you can

Tri-County Health Office advises not using ER for non-urgent health issues, especially during current severe weather conditions and annual flu season

The Tri-County Health Officer is cautioning that people with non-urgent health conditions may face long waits at hospital emergency departments across the Portland metro area. The public should know that emergency departments have been unusually busy for several days and that those with non-urgent issues should consider seeking care from a primary care provider or urgent care.

People with urgent, serious or life-threatening conditions are continuing to receive the care they need,” said Dr. Paul Lewis, Health Officer for Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties.

However, unprecedented numbers of patients reporting to area hospitals and high ambulance volume are causing in longer-than-usual waits and for ambulances to be directed to more distant destinations than typical.

Several factors are contributing to the backup. First, the number of people who have already been admitted to area hospitals is high. Having so many people receiving in-patient care slows the ability of emergency department staff to move patients out of the emergency department and into an in-patient bed. Second, Dr. Jon Jui, the Multnomah County Emergency Services Medical Director, said there has also been a pent-up demand for care due to the recent three-day holiday weekends, eight days of severe weather and the annual flu season.

“No one will be turned away from hospital,” Dr. Lewis said. “But if you or a loved one have a non-urgent matter, please consider visiting an urgent care office or your own provider before heading to the ER.”

 

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Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 8)

1) Hazelnut Grove homeless camp public meeting (Sunday, Jan. 15)
2) Portland’s new inclusionary housing program (Friday, Jan. 13)
3) Portland Harbor Superfund cleanup plan


1) Hazelnut Grove homeless camp public meeting (Sunday, Jan. 15)

There have been reports of leadership shakeups at the Hazelnut Grove homeless camp in Overlook. The Overlook Neighborhood Association has been in contact with Mayor Ted Wheeler’s office to discuss the future of the camp. We’ll update neighbors as we learn more.

In the meantime, Hazelnut Grove has invited the public to a meeting to hear about the turmoil there and changes. Members of the camp will respond to community concerns.

Hazelnut Grove homeless camp public meeting
Sunday, Jan. 15, 10 a.m.
Overlook Park

2) Portland’s new inclusionary housing program (Friday, Jan. 13)

Beginning Feb. 1, buildings with 20 or more residential units will be part of Portland’s Inclusionary Housing Program, which hopes to make affordable housing units available throughout the city. The program requires a minimum amount of units be affordable to households earning no more than 80 percent of area median income, with five alternatives for providing affordability, and varying incentives.

Developers and the general public are invited to a lunch session to hear more information about the program details and what to expect when submitting a building permit for a housing project.

The presentation will address questions such as:

  • Which developments are exempt from the Inclusionary Housing Program?
  • What are my options to meet the program requirements?
  • What incentives apply to help off-set the cost of providing affordable units?
  • Who do I contact with questions about a specific project?
  • How do I figure out what the rents will be for the affordable units?

Portland Housing Bureau and Bureau of Development Services staff will be available to answer questions. Registration is not required.

Inclusionary housing information session
Friday, Jan. 13, noon – 1 p.m.
Bureau of Development Services at CH2M Center (2020 SW 4th Ave.)
Lincoln Conference Room (1st Floor)

3) Portland Harbor Superfund cleanup plan

The Environmental Protection Agency last week released its final cleanup plan for about 10 miles of the Willamette River including areas adjacent to the Overlook Neighborhood. The plan addresses contaminated sediments through dredging, capping, enhanced natural recovery, and monitored natural recovery, including removal of over three million cubic yards of contaminated sediments. It also addresses contaminated groundwater that could re-contaminate the river and river banks. About 1,774 acres of the site with lower contaminant levels are expected to recover naturally over time. Active cleanup work at the site is now expected to take as much as 13 years and cost about $1 billion.

At the request of community groups and stakeholders, the EPA plans to host community information sessions to present the details of the final remedy this March. Details will be posted online as these information sessions are scheduled.

Posted in Homeless, Land Use, Portland - City | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Jan. 8)

Overlook Neighborhood Update (Dec. 24)

1) Happy Holidays from OKNA
2) Holiday garbage and recycling pickup
3) OKNA Board Meeting
4) Arts Tax oversight committee recruiting
5) Six months of sun at Beach School


1) Happy Holidays from OKNA

The Overlook Neighborhood Association wishes all of our neighborhood residents a wonderful holiday season and a happy New Year. We thank everyone who helped make Overlook the city’s best neighborhood in 2016 and look forward to building on our success in 2017.

The weekly email will take next week off for the holidays. See you again the first week of January.

2) Holiday garbage and recycling pickup

When holidays fall on a Sunday, as Christmas and New Year’s do this year, there is no change to the pickup schedule. Please put your garbage and recycling out on your normal day.

If you’d like to receive a weekly email reminder about what to put out on the curb that week, sign up at the city’s collection website.

3) OKNA Board Meeting

The Overlook Neighborhood Association Board will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 3. The board will discuss plans for the new year, Overlook Views and more. Agenda.

OKNA Board Meeting
Tuesday, Jan. 3, 6:30-8 p.m.
Overlook House (3839 N Melrose Dr.)

4) Arts Tax oversight committee recruiting

The purpose of the Committee is to review the disbursements and outcomes of the Arts Education & Access Fund, oversee the measures of effectiveness of the funding, and report its findings annually to City Council. An interest in art, music, or dance is helpful but not necessary for membership. More important is an interest in monitoring Arts Tax expenditures and correlating them to the purpose of the Tax.

Committee members are appointed to two-year terms by the City of Portland. The Committee meets two to four times per year and sub-committees meet more often.

Learn more and apply online.

5) Six months of sun at Beach School

A pinhole camera mounted at Beach School for six months (solstice-to-solstice) tracked the path of the sun across the sky each day. The image captured the iconic water tower. We hope you enjoy it as the days start to grow longer.

Copyright Christian Trejbal 2016

Posted in OKNA, Portland - City | Comments Off on Overlook Neighborhood Update (Dec. 24)