Overlook Neighborhood Update (July 2)

1) Adidas parking and neighborhood relations
2) Memorial for Brian Spaulding
3) Earthquake preparation
4) No OKNA Board meeting in July
5) Celebrate America’s Independence responsibly and legally 


1) Adidas parking and neighborhood relations

A delegation from the neighborhood met with Adidas on June 28 to discuss parking and other issues. The delegation included three members of the Overlook Neighborhood Association Board – Cynthia Sulaski, Vice Chair Alan Crana and Chair Chris Trejbal – and four Adidas neighbors. We met with Tom Hughes, Adidas’ corporate affairs manager.

The meeting went very well. Learn more about it on our website.

2) Memorial for Brian Spaulding

George and Carolyn Spaulding, long-time Overlook residents, tragically lost their son, Brian, on June 12. Brian grew up in Overlook and attended Beach and Oakley Green Schools. George serves on the OKNA Board.

The Spaulding family will celebrate Brian’s life with family and friends at Tabor Space (5441 SE Belmont St.) on Saturday, July 8, 10:30-1:30. Personal tributes will be made at noon.

3) Earthquake preparation

A reminder that the Neighborhood Emergency Teams (NETs) of Overlook and Arbor Lodge/Kenton invite you to test your family and community emergency plans during a joint call-up exercise on Saturday, July 15.

NET members are trained to provide neighborhood emergency disaster assistance. They will save lives and property until professional responders can arrive.

Learn more.

4) No OKNA Board meeting in July

The Overlook Neighborhood Association Board will not meet on the first Tuesday of July, which falls on July 4. We hope you will join us for discussion at the OKNA general meeting on July 18, 6:30 p.m., at Lucky Labrador Tap Room on N Killingsworth Street.

5) Celebrate America’s Independence responsibly and legally

On Tuesday, people will celebrate the Fourth of July with community parades, picnics, barbecues and fireworks. Sadly, Independence Day also includes tragic events and injuries resulting from illegal fireworks use and is both traumatizing and harmful to children, animals, and a growing number of war veterans.

Aside from the danger (both legal and personal) of exploding illegal fireworks, there’s a huge risk of fire and property damage now that the hot, dry summer has arrived.

Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. Oregon law forbids possession, use or sale of fireworks that fly, explode or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches in the air. Bottle rockets, Roman candles and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon.

Residents who see illegal fireworks going off can call 911 if there is an immediate threat to life and property or a serious injury. If there is no immediate threat or injury, people can call the police non-emergency number at 503-823-3333.

Law enforcement receives a tremendous number of calls every July 4 and cannot respond to each one immediately.

The best thing for everyone, then, is not to be stupid. Celebrate America’s Independence, but do it responsibly and legally. Do you really want to be the person who sets the neighborhood on fire or scares your neighbor’s pet into running away?

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